I wanted to investigate a dodgy key on my Roland HP 136 Digital Piano, and found the web to be surprisingly unable to advise me on how to go about this. This post presents some information that I had hoped to find. (Follow this advice at your own risk, I merely claim that this worked for me.)

Opening the case

  1. Remove two screws from the underside of the piano …
  2. … then three screws from the back of the piano…
  3. … and then lift the lid. Result:

Removing a key

  1. Unhook the spring at the back of the key.
  2. Push a screwdriver into the slot (as shown in the photo below) and prise the key out.
  3. I found that in order to free the key completely, I had to slide the whole rack of keys backwards a little. This required removing several more bolts from the piano’s underside.


It turned out that the dodgy key was caused by a snapped hammer. I superglued it back together and it has been playing fine ever since.

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Comments on: "How to fix a Roland HP 136 Digital Piano" (13)

  1. Hi friend, very goog post. I don´t sugest anyone to fix their own digital piano but in some cases we can avoid expending a lot of money in very simple problems.
    Regards from Brazil

    • Anthony said:

      Why Not? Many people are just as capable to repair something as well as a “technician”.
      I do not wish to hear,
      ” I don´t suggest anyone to fix their own digital piano “

  2. Maarten said:

    Hi John,

    It appears I have experienced the problem as you had. I too have an HP136 and one day, one of the keys suddenly went a bit loose. After opening up the piano up (following your instructions), I also found that one of the hammers had snapped off

    I had hoped that it would have been a part that can easily be replaced, but it seems that on this type of piano, the whole keyboard mechanism is one ‘whole’ and cannot simple be taken apart and reassembled.

    I think I will also try to reattach the broken hammer with some superglue. Can you give me some tips on which kind of glue you used?

    All the best from the Netherlands,

    Maarten

  3. Peter Boye Larsen said:

    Thanks a lot! Really helpful, and now the binding key is working again. Some cleaning was all that was needed.

  4. David James said:

    Thanks John! I was actually working on an old RD-200 piano, and while that model does not have hammers, your tip on removing the keys helped me to realize that I should try to remove my keys to investigate the problems I was having with several dead keys. I was able to remove the keys and then vacuum the problem areas and wipe away the dust and grime from the related circuitry and now all five of the dead keys I had work fine. If you are ever in Ottawa Canada the beers on me!

  5. Thanks for sharing your info and clear pictures.

    I had same problem witch i solved with your help..
    Now my 6 year daughter can play her lessons again..
    Thanks Jari

  6. excellent instructions. I was able to do the same thing with a HP-236 piano from Roland. With HP-236 you just have to different number of screws but the key comes out easily by releasing the front of the key with a screw driver.

    • I have an hp236 by Roland and the keys look completely different. Where did you put the driver to get the key out? Also, does anyone know where to get service manuals for Roland pianos?

  7. John Nennig said:

    As a technician I to would like to know where to get troubleshooting information. We bought the 236 for my son to play, we have no clue how to play but enjoyed the built in demonstration pieces which no longer function. John Nennig

  8. Anthony said:

    anyone know how to open a HP 1800, and also how to replace the keys?

  9. Anthony said:

    Lots of replies here, I got it figured out.

  10. Zaid el adwan said:

    Thank you ,thank you ,thank you, i followed you instructions and managed to fix 6 snapped hammers in my roland hp136 i used epoxy glue for more durability and it worked like a charm i also had to unscrew all the bolts downside to free the keys completely as you mentioned before .

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